Vaginitis Treatment - How to Cure, Treat Vaginitis?
 

Vaginitis treatment

The treatment for vaginitis depends on the diagnosis and infection. There are a number of treatment options and they include oral antibiotics or antibiotic creams, anti-fungal medications or those applied directly to the vulvar and vagina area and antibacterial cream or ointment. Anti-histamine medications or cortisone creams may be useful to decrease the inflammation and immediate irritation in the skin. If the skin is severely dry and atrophic, then minimally absorbed local vaginal estrogens, either in cream, ring or tablet form, may be helpful to reverse these effects.

In association with antibiotic treatment, vulvar and vaginal hygiene techniques are often helpful. Cleaning of the vulvar region and allowing more air to circulate to the genitopelvic region is helpful.  Cotton underwear or boxers may be helpful to decrease symptoms. Some women may find the use of sitz baths helpful too in order to decrease symptoms. Cool sitz baths can ease swelling and inflammation and many find them especially soothing for the vulvar tissue. According to Wikipedia, a sitz bath can be created by filling a tub with water and gently soaking it in for a few minutes; the baths can be filled with just water, or add salt, baking soda, or chamomile tea bags. If the vaginitis is caused by a sexually transmitted infection, it is essential to make sure that sexual partners receive treatment even if they are without symptoms. If the partner is untreated, you may get reinfected.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC - www.cdc.org) there are a variety of medications to treat specific causes of vaginitis.

For bacterial vaginosis the following regimes are accepted options:

Drug NameDrug StrengthDosage InfoLength of Treament

Metronidazole*

-

500 mg - orally, twice per day

7 days

Or, Metronidazole Gel

0.75%

5g - intravaginally,once per day

5 days

Or, Clindamycin** Cream

2%

5g intravaginally, once per day at bedtime

7 days

Alternative Regimens

Drug NameDrug StrengthDosage InfoLength of Treament

Tinidazole

-

2g - orally, once per day

2 days

Or, Tinidazole

-

1g - orally, once per day

5 days

Or, Clindamycin

-

300mg - orally, twice per day

7 days

Or, Clindamycin Ovules

-

100mg - intravaginally, at bedtime

7 days

Recommended Regimens for Pregnant Women***

Drug NameDrug StrengthDosage InfoLength of Treament

Metronidazole*

-

500mg - orally, twice per day

7 days

Or, Metronidazole

-

250mg - orally, 3 times per day

7 days

Or, Clindamycin

-

300mg - orally, twice per day

7 days

Recommended regimens for Trichomoniasis

Drug NameDrug StrengthDosage InfoLength of Treament

Metronidazole

-

2g - orally, single dose

Once

Or, Trinidazole

-

2g -orally, single dose

Once

Or, Clindamycin

-

300mg - orally, twice per day

7 days

Or, Metronidazole

-

500mg - orally, twice per day

7 days

You are not required to schedule follow-up visits with your health care professional if your symptoms resolve. However, women who experience repeat infections or frequent infections should reschedule a follow up visit.

Chronic infection with bacterial vaginosis warrants careful evaluation and may need chronic suppressive treatment.

Since there is a high rate of reinfection among patients, many health care professionals advise rescreening for this infection at a 3 month interval. Sexual partners who have had intercourse with those with diagnosed trchimoniasis should also be treated. In addition, women with this infection should be advised to abstain from sex until they and their sex partners are fully treated and cured. 

* Patients should be advised to avoid consuming alcohol during treatment with metronidazole or tinidazole. Abstinence from alcohol use should continue for 24 hours after completion of metronidazole or 72 hours after completion of Tinidazole.

** Clindamycin cream is oil-based and might weaken latex condoms and diaphragms for 5 days after use (refer to clindamycin product labeling for additional information).

*** MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. www.cdc.gov/mmwr. Recommendations and Reports.  December 17, 2010 Vol 52.  Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2010..

The above charts have been adapted from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC www.cdc.org) standard recommendations document.

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Symptoms

Read more about symptoms affecting the vulva and vagina that may be causing discomfort or pain.

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Disorders

Read more about vulvar and vaginal disorders that affect women and their quality of life.

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